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Hazards Student Conference 2019 (AS/A-level Geography, all specifications)

Geography 16-18 Student Revision

David Redfern, Cameron Dunn, Sue Warn, Professor David Petley, Dr Servel Miller, Paul Cole

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1 FREE teacher place for every 10 student places booked!

Why attend?

Ignite your students’ interest in all aspects of hazards geography, from volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis to human responses and management.
 
Our panel of expert speakers will cover the very latest developments in this ever-changing field, deepening students’ knowledge and providing topical content that will take their exam responses to the next level.
 
This full-day conference will:
  • Introduce a huge range of new and relevant case studies that illustrate key concepts, processes and themes across different hazards
  • Engage students with cutting-edge academic theory, as leading geographers talk about their research and experiences around the world
  • Reinforce and extend students’ understanding of hazards, consolidating what they’ve learnt in lessons and helping to maximise marks in the exams
  • Provide each student with a booklet of the day’s notes, which includes links to online resources and further reading
Booking references: GE291119 / GE271119 / GE221119

Programme



 
10.30am Registration opens
11.00am Welcome and introductions – Sue Warn
Session timings TBC Session TBC – Dr. Paul Cole (LDN only)
Paul’s talk will focus around his research. He is the Associate Professor of Volcanology at the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University.
 
Earthquake impact (in Megacities) - it’s all about structure – Dr. Martin Degg
During this talk, your students will explore the importance of both physical socio-economic and political structures and their influence on risk from tectonic disasters in mega cities.
 
Faulty plates and cracked crusts – Cameron Dunn
Underpinning your understanding of tectonic hazards and disasters, is a detailed grasp of plate tectonic theory and the processes that cause plate motion and generate hazardous events. This session will explore these processes, within the theoretical framework of the plate tectonics paradigm. Cameron will highlight why some hazardous places are especially vulnerable due to their physical geography, and how this increases risk for people and their property.
 
Impacts of recent earthquakes in New Zealand – Professor David Petley
Your students will study the impacts of recent earthquakes in New Zealand (Christchurch Kaikoura) and the concerns about the future (Alpine fault, Wellington Hikarangi subduction zone and another ‘black swan‘ like Christ church).
 
Why do some hazardous events morph into human disasters? – David Redfern (NOTTS / MCR only)
This talk will examine the relationships between a ‘hazard’ and a ‘disaster’ and will focus particularly on the importance of place (including physical factors) and development in understanding disaster impact, vulnerability and resilience. David will illustrate these concepts with reference to a range of tectonic events that have taken place in recent decades, including contemporary ones.
Rumblings in the North Atlantic - Iceland’s volcanoes and their hazards – Professor Fiona Tweed
This talk will outline key aspects of Iceland’s plate tectonic setting and will specifically focus on Iceland’s volcanic activity. Events from the last ten years will be used as a lens through which to view the diversity of hazards and impacts created by some of Iceland’s historic eruptions. Beneficial aspects of Iceland’s tectonic context, such as volcano tourism and geothermal energy, will also be highlighted. Key challenges associated with managing risks from Iceland’s volcanic hazards will be considered, particularly in the context of research on the potential impacts of future volcanic eruptions.
 
Concepts, theories and models – Sue Warn
Your students will explore some of the key concepts models and theories involved in a study of tectonic hazards and focus on how to use them to enhance the quality of examination responses. Sue will link key concepts models and theories to specific case studies.
3.45pm Conference ends

*Please note: lunch is not provided.

Why attend?

Ignite your students’ interest in all aspects of hazards geography, from volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis to human responses and management.
 
Our panel of expert speakers will cover the very latest developments in this ever-changing field, deepening students’ knowledge and providing topical content that will take their exam responses to the next level.
 
This full-day conference will:
  • Introduce a huge range of new and relevant case studies that illustrate key concepts, processes and themes across different hazards
  • Engage students with cutting-edge academic theory, as leading geographers talk about their research and experiences around the world
  • Reinforce and extend students’ understanding of hazards, consolidating what they’ve learnt in lessons and helping to maximise marks in the exams
  • Provide each student with a booklet of the day’s notes, which includes links to online resources and further reading
Booking references: GE291119 / GE271119 / GE221119

Programme



 
10.30am Registration opens
11.00am Welcome and introductions – Sue Warn
Session timings TBC Session TBC – Dr. Paul Cole (LDN only)
Paul’s talk will focus around his research. He is the Associate Professor of Volcanology at the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University.
 
Earthquake impact (in Megacities) - it’s all about structure – Dr. Martin Degg
During this talk, your students will explore the importance of both physical socio-economic and political structures and their influence on risk from tectonic disasters in mega cities.
 
Faulty plates and cracked crusts – Cameron Dunn
Underpinning your understanding of tectonic hazards and disasters, is a detailed grasp of plate tectonic theory and the processes that cause plate motion and generate hazardous events. This session will explore these processes, within the theoretical framework of the plate tectonics paradigm. Cameron will highlight why some hazardous places are especially vulnerable due to their physical geography, and how this increases risk for people and their property.
 
Impacts of recent earthquakes in New Zealand – Professor David Petley
Your students will study the impacts of recent earthquakes in New Zealand (Christchurch Kaikoura) and the concerns about the future (Alpine fault, Wellington Hikarangi subduction zone and another ‘black swan‘ like Christ church).
 
Why do some hazardous events morph into human disasters? – David Redfern (NOTTS / MCR only)
This talk will examine the relationships between a ‘hazard’ and a ‘disaster’ and will focus particularly on the importance of place (including physical factors) and development in understanding disaster impact, vulnerability and resilience. David will illustrate these concepts with reference to a range of tectonic events that have taken place in recent decades, including contemporary ones.
Rumblings in the North Atlantic - Iceland’s volcanoes and their hazards – Professor Fiona Tweed
This talk will outline key aspects of Iceland’s plate tectonic setting and will specifically focus on Iceland’s volcanic activity. Events from the last ten years will be used as a lens through which to view the diversity of hazards and impacts created by some of Iceland’s historic eruptions. Beneficial aspects of Iceland’s tectonic context, such as volcano tourism and geothermal energy, will also be highlighted. Key challenges associated with managing risks from Iceland’s volcanic hazards will be considered, particularly in the context of research on the potential impacts of future volcanic eruptions.
 
Concepts, theories and models – Sue Warn
Your students will explore some of the key concepts models and theories involved in a study of tectonic hazards and focus on how to use them to enhance the quality of examination responses. Sue will link key concepts models and theories to specific case studies.
3.45pm Conference ends

*Please note: lunch is not provided.

Why attend?

Ignite your students’ interest in all aspects of hazards geography, from volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis to human responses and management.
 
Our panel of expert speakers will cover the very latest developments in this ever-changing field, deepening students’ knowledge and providing topical content that will take their exam responses to the next level.
 
This full-day conference will:
  • Introduce a huge range of new and relevant case studies that illustrate key concepts, processes and themes across different hazards
  • Engage students with cutting-edge academic theory, as leading geographers talk about their research and experiences around the world
  • Reinforce and extend students’ understanding of hazards, consolidating what they’ve learnt in lessons and helping to maximise marks in the exams
  • Provide each student with a booklet of the day’s notes, which includes links to online resources and further reading
Booking references: GE291119 / GE271119 / GE221119

Programme



 
10.30am Registration opens
11.00am Welcome and introductions – Sue Warn
Session timings TBC Session TBC – Dr. Paul Cole (LDN only)
Paul’s talk will focus around his research. He is the Associate Professor of Volcanology at the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University.
 
Earthquake impact (in Megacities) - it’s all about structure – Dr. Martin Degg
During this talk, your students will explore the importance of both physical socio-economic and political structures and their influence on risk from tectonic disasters in mega cities.
 
Faulty plates and cracked crusts – Cameron Dunn
Underpinning your understanding of tectonic hazards and disasters, is a detailed grasp of plate tectonic theory and the processes that cause plate motion and generate hazardous events. This session will explore these processes, within the theoretical framework of the plate tectonics paradigm. Cameron will highlight why some hazardous places are especially vulnerable due to their physical geography, and how this increases risk for people and their property.
 
Impacts of recent earthquakes in New Zealand – Professor David Petley
Your students will study the impacts of recent earthquakes in New Zealand (Christchurch Kaikoura) and the concerns about the future (Alpine fault, Wellington Hikarangi subduction zone and another ‘black swan‘ like Christ church).
 
Why do some hazardous events morph into human disasters? – David Redfern (NOTTS / MCR only)
This talk will examine the relationships between a ‘hazard’ and a ‘disaster’ and will focus particularly on the importance of place (including physical factors) and development in understanding disaster impact, vulnerability and resilience. David will illustrate these concepts with reference to a range of tectonic events that have taken place in recent decades, including contemporary ones.
Rumblings in the North Atlantic - Iceland’s volcanoes and their hazards – Professor Fiona Tweed
This talk will outline key aspects of Iceland’s plate tectonic setting and will specifically focus on Iceland’s volcanic activity. Events from the last ten years will be used as a lens through which to view the diversity of hazards and impacts created by some of Iceland’s historic eruptions. Beneficial aspects of Iceland’s tectonic context, such as volcano tourism and geothermal energy, will also be highlighted. Key challenges associated with managing risks from Iceland’s volcanic hazards will be considered, particularly in the context of research on the potential impacts of future volcanic eruptions.
 
Concepts, theories and models – Sue Warn
Your students will explore some of the key concepts models and theories involved in a study of tectonic hazards and focus on how to use them to enhance the quality of examination responses. Sue will link key concepts models and theories to specific case studies.
3.45pm Conference ends

*Please note: lunch is not provided.

Presenters

Cameron Dunn - Presenter
Cameron Dunn - Presenter
Read Biography
Dr Servel Miller - Presenter
Dr Servel Miller - Presenter
Read Biography
Professor David Petley - Presenter
Professor David Petley - Presenter
Read Biography
David Redfern - Presenter
David Redfern - Presenter
Read Biography
Sue Warn - Presenter
Sue Warn - Presenter
Read Biography
Paul Cole  - Presenter
Paul Cole - Presenter
Read Biography

Presenters

Cameron Dunn - Presenter
Cameron Dunn - Presenter
Read Biography
Dr Servel Miller - Presenter
Dr Servel Miller - Presenter
Read Biography
Professor David Petley - Presenter
Professor David Petley - Presenter
Read Biography
David Redfern - Presenter
David Redfern - Presenter
Read Biography
Sue Warn - Presenter
Sue Warn - Presenter
Read Biography
Paul Cole  - Presenter
Paul Cole - Presenter
Read Biography

Presenters

Cameron Dunn - Presenter
Cameron Dunn - Presenter
Read Biography
Dr Servel Miller - Presenter
Dr Servel Miller - Presenter
Read Biography
Professor David Petley - Presenter
Professor David Petley - Presenter
Read Biography
David Redfern - Presenter
David Redfern - Presenter
Read Biography
Sue Warn - Presenter
Sue Warn - Presenter
Read Biography
Paul Cole  - Presenter
Paul Cole - Presenter
Read Biography

Venue

GE221119
Nottingham - Venue TBC
The venue will be confirmed
at least 2 weeks before the event

Venue

GE291119
Friends House
173 - 177 Euston Road
London
NW1 2BJ
Google map directions

Venue

GE271119
Manchester - venue TBC
The venue will be confirmed
at least 2 weeks before the event